Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Blowing in the wind

My artichokes in blown disarray. I notice that already new shoots are growing at the base. I plan to harvest all the flower heads tomorrow then chop back the branches and let the new baby shoots become the main plants for next year.
I have no shortage of herbs, but given their vigour, I have a shortage of path to walk on beside them.
Ah, compost success. This is the old compost plot, where I was concerned at the absence of worms before I went away. But tonight I turned it over with the fork and there is a wonderful abundance of red worms. I have it earmarked for the chook grave garden where the calendulas and alyssum and dill are bedraggled and past their prime.
This wind has blown over the garlic, which I cannot remember happening before. I probably should harvest the bent garlic as soon as the sun shines. The kale on the right has grey aphids. I am grateful for any suggestions on how to deal with this. We had it two years ago and it rendered the leaves quite yucky and not worth eating. I have been plucking off the affected leaves (it isn't covered at the moment) and feeding them to the chooks.
So overgrown and wild that I can barely tell where the garden stops and the lawn begins. The rhubarb seems to be holding out against the convulvulus and the spuds should be ready to eat now.
First sunflower of the season.
Gifts from my favourite out laws. The glass dish is from a very sweet lady of 89 and I plan to find some special way of using it. The doilies were crocheted by Favourite Handyman's great grandmother and given to me by his sister. I have one soaking in ecostore laundry whitener at the moment. I am wary of ruining it so avoided napisan and am soaking one at a time. I plan to make a bag to say thank you to my sil and use one of these as the motif on it.

3 comments:

syeds said...

Nice article.
Letters

robertguyton said...

Gcardoons instead of globe artichokes. The leaf stems are very nice to eat - for better value than a few 'globes'. They also love the maritime climate.
Grow them from seed - easy!

Sandra - too heavy to stand on a soapbox, but undeterred said...

Thanks. I will try cardoons next year. I remember Clarissa Dickson Wright of Two Fat Ladies fame extolling the virtues of cardoons in her autobiography - she had a friend grow them specially for her.